In 1934 “a private company acquired land part of Bulmore Farm Caerleon, on which to build an open air swimming pool, cafe and restaurant. Bulmore Lido as it became well known, opened to members of the public in July and they flocked there in hundreds on clement days, travelling by specially timed omnibuses, on foot and by bicycle (motor cars were then very thin on the ground as family transport). Situated alongside the River Usk, the 8.5 acre complex comprising large adult pool and smaller children’s pool with adjoining lawns, became Newport’s favourite out-of-town resort, gradually relieving St Brides Lighthouse foreshore of its dubious hold on this honour. Bulmore’s popularity held in varying degrees for the next 55 years until its waning fortunes finally fell victim to the changing tastes of a much more affluent, adventurous and wide-ranging society.
A few weeks after the opening of Bulmore Lido, another open air swimming pool made its debut, but although it too could he described as having similar rural aspect, it could almost he said to he within the town. Situated on the side of a wooded slope in the grounds of Alltyryn House, it was approached down a long winding path from the junction of Barrack Hill and Alltyryn View. The entrance gate was not far from the Barrack Hill omnibus terminus.

The pool, measuring 100 feet by 35 feet was placed in a dingle where the house’s original spring and ornamental pools had been situated, and well may be remembered for having a very uneven (if not rocky) bottom. Fine weather at Alltyryn always seemed to bring out a permanent population of biting midges. The Lido did not survive the 1960s and is now part of Newport Borough Council’s Alltyryn Wildlife Nature Footpath.”